UPET/SPECT/CT Facility

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Director, Craig Branch, Ph.D.
Associate Director, Linda A. Jelicks, Ph.D.
Radiochemistry Director, Ekaterina Dadachova, Ph.D.
Expert Advisor, Eugene Fine, M.D.
Operations Manager, Wade Koba, BSOE
Acting μPET Health and Medical Physicist, Wade Koba, BSOE


From Einstein Academic Honors (http://www.einstein.yu.edu/faculty/): Winning Image — A team of Einstein researchers led by Dr. Paul Frenette, have received the 2013 Inveon Image of the Year Award for their submission illustrating their study of prostate cancer in mice. The annual award, run by Siemens Healthcare Global, invites customers to demonstrate their use of the company’s scanners in conducting quality research. Entries are evaluated on the basis of scientific merit, image quality and presentation for each category. Dr. Frenette’s team included faculty members Drs. Linda Jelicks and Eugene Fine, and Wade Koba. Dr. Frenette is professor of medicine and of cell biology; Dr. Jelicks is associate professor of physiology & biophysics; Dr. Fine is clinical professor of radiology; and Mr. Koba is an associate in radiology.

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See: Autonomic nerve development contributes to prostate cancer progression. Magnon C, Hall SJ, Lin J, Xue X, Gerber L, Freedland SJ, Frenette PS. Science. 2013 Jul 12;341(6142):1236361. doi: 10.1126/science.1236361. PMID: 23846904


From the Einstein Magazine back cover Spring/Summer 2013

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Movie of co-registered MRI (grayscale) and PET (color) images of a mouse with a large pancreatic tumor: The tumor (in aqua), spleen (in yellow), and kidneys (lavender) are shown in 3D. The mouse is part of a study by Dr. Steven K. Libutti and Dr. Ziqiang Yuan (Department of Surgery). The study is supported by grants from the NIH, NCI-R01 (1R01CA170911) and NCI-U54 (1U54CA151668), and AACR-Caring for Carcinoid Foundation. The imaging was performed in the Gruss MRRC. MRI images were acquired with the 9.4T Varian MRI system by Mr. Kamalakar Ambadipudi under the supervision of Dr. Min-Hui Cui. PET images were acquired with the Siemens Inveon Trimodal scanner by Mr. Wade Koba. The co-registration and 3D reconstruction was performed by Dr. Linda Jelicks using the 3D Visualization Tool in Inveon Research Workplace software (Visage Imaging and Siemens Medical Solutions).
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The Siemens Inveon Docked Trimodal PET/SPECT/CT Small Animal Imaging facility in MRRC room 305 provides insight into disease biology and evaluation of novel therapeutic options in small animal mouse and rat models of disease. The docked PET/SPECT/CT system combines the Inveon Docked PET scanner with an Inveon SPECT/CT system. In the docked configuration, both gantries can operate independently under the control of individual workstations or as a single gantry under the control of a single workstation. Independent PET and CT or SPECT/CT studies can be performed. A BioVet (m2m imaging) physiological monitoring and heating system and a portable isoflurane anesthesia system are associated with the scanner.

Inveon 3D Visualization and Analysis software permits co-registration of multimodality images. The M. Donald Blaufox Laboratory for Molecular Imaging now attracts a diverse group of investigators from the Einstein community to enhance their molecular research. Pilot studies and initial investigations during the lab’s start-up period are now resulting in the surest evidence for the ongoing maturation of μPET as a useful technique for Einstein’s molecular biologists, namely grant submissions and publications. Published investigations range from the role of Kcne2 deletion in NIS-expressing tissues and thyroid function to adiponectin deletion in breast cancer development and evolution, early detection of T. cruzi cardiomyopathy, melanoma responsiveness to radioimmunotherapy, and cardiac metabolic response to chronic dietary carbohydrate restriction. Other studies underway include evaluation of rodent models of cerebral malaria, Chagas disease, cancer, lung perfusion, and glucose uptake in pregnancy.

Radioactive tracers now in active use include 18FDG (fluorodeoxyglucose), 99mTc, 64Cu and 124I.

The Siemens Inveon Docked Trimodal PET/SPECT/CT Small Animal Imaging facility in MRRC room 305 provides insight into disease biology and evaluation of novel therapeutic options in small animal mouse and rat models of disease. The docked PET/SPECT/CT system combines the Inveon Docked PET scanner with an Inveon SPECT/CT system. In the docked configuration, both gantries can operate independently under the control of individual workstations or as a single gantry under the control of a single workstation. Independent PET and CT or SPECT/CT studies can be performed. A BioVet (m2m imaging) physiological monitoring and heating system and a portable isoflurane anesthesia system are associated with the scanner. TTL gating ports allow input of respiratory and cardiac trigger signals from the BioVet system.

PMOD and Inveon 3D Visualization and Analysis software permits co-registration of multimodality images, calculation of bone volume/tissue volume, bone surface/volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number, and trabecular spacing.

Computed tomography (CT) uses x-rays to create 3D images of small animals. Applications include longitudinal studies of tumor progression, assessment of bone mineral density in live animals or specimens is, and, with the addition of exogeneous contrast agents, studies of the vasculature and organs. Anatomic images acquired with CT can be co-registered with metabolic images acquired with PET or SPECT.

Both positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use radioactively labeled molecules that interact with a specific cellular target after injection. SPECT uses gamma emitters, such as 99mTc, 123I, 111In, 201Tl, that permit targeting of hypoxia, apoptosis, inflammation, and membrane bound integrins. These tracers are typically longer-lived than PET tracers and permit studies of slower biological processes.

For further information, please contact Mr. Wade Koba (x8581), Dr. Linda Jelicks (x2722), or Dr. Eugene Fine (718.904.2639).

Contents


Inveon Specifications

PET

  • Rotating Co-57 transmission source with emission energy of 122 keV
  • Field of View: 127 mm
  • Resolution at Center of FOV: 1.4 mm

SPECT

  • Detects gamma rays from 35keV to 300keV
  • 150 mm x 150 mm active area
  • Sub-millimeter resolution

CT

  • 125 mm Detector has 3072 x 2048 pixels and may be configured for a FOV as large as 84 mm x 55 mm with a resolution of 40 microns.

Procedures for Using the Inveon μPET/SPECT/CT

Please contact MicroPET staff to discuss the details of your study. After consultation, complete the μPET Imaging Request (PDF) form. Fees and associated charges are listed on the Lab Charges Lab Charges (PDF) form.

The Gruss MRRC μPET Facility, Institution Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), Environment Health and Safety Services (EH&S) and Laboratory Animal Facilities (LAF) require the following application procedure for the use of μPET in any research project.

Submit a summary research proposal to the Gruss MRRC μPET Facility.

Submit a single research proposal describing the background, objectives and methods (not exceeding two pages) to Dr. Linda Jelicks. This proposal submission is understood to be a draft. We expect that several discussions may be required to refine the aims, tracers, numbers of animals, and the overall design. The purpose of the draft is to get the process started. The proposal will be reviewed for scientific merit and feasibility for μPET/SPECT/CT Imaging. Contact Dr. Jelicks to meet and discuss this proposal, by phone at (718) 430-2722, or by email (attach draft proposal and pertinent references).

Submit the final proposal to IACUC and EH&S.

Once the proposal has reached a point where the aims, type of study, numbers and species of animals needed, tracers required, and duration of study are defined, as well as any special requirements for quantitative modeling and image processing, the protocol will need to be submitted to IACUC (animal use) and EH&S (radiation use and safety). IACUC application forms are available from the IACUC web site; on-campus investigators submit Application of Protocol to Dr. Sunder Shrestha, (IACUC, Van Etten, Room 468-B, Resnick Campus). Off campus investigators must show approval from house institution. EH&S contact information is available on the EH&S web site.
WARNING: Radiation Safety
  • Please refer to, and follow, the dose schedule in the application for commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. Dose schedule is based on the information currently available in the literature and is approved by the EH&S. Investigators should follow and refer to this schedule in IACUC and EH&S applications as follows as per standard operating procedure for μPET imaging. Please note this schedule is applicable to static imaging only. For dynamic imaging or a specialized technique, such as ECG gating, and imaging with other positron tracers not included in the document and for some other specific application, dose schedule may vary. The protocol in such cases can be developed in consultation with the μPET Facility.
  • For handling radioactive animals or attending the μPET/SPECT scan, if required (not common), researchers without radiation safety training must contact EH&S for training and authorization. For details on Einstein policies on the use of radioactive materials and radiation safety site web site.


We cannot initiate a protocol without all the above approvals and a source of funding. Once the approvals have been obtained, you may schedule studies.

Schedule use of the μPET scanner.

Contact Wade Koba by phone ((718) 430-8581) or email to schedule time. Schedule Veterinary Technical Assistance, if needed (not common), at least 1 week ahead of scheduled date. Contact Dr. Lawrence Herbst at (718) 430-8553 or Dr. Sunder Shrestha at (718) 430-3563.

If animals are obtained from non-commercial sources, or other research facilities, please arrange to have the animal health reports sent to Dr. Herbst.

Dr. Herbst's address is: Dr. Lawrence Herbst, Director of Animal Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue Van Etten, Room 460, Bronx, NY 10461; he can also be reached by phone at (718) 430-8553 or by email.

The following grant must be acknowledged in papers submitted for publication and in abstracts for submission for conferences: NIH S10RR029545 "MicroPET/SPECT/CT Animal Imaging Device" which supported the purchase of the Inveon imaging scanner

Associated Laboratories

Linda Jelicks

Dr. Jelicks supports multimodality applications in the MRRC. Her specific focus areas include cardiac gated imaging, studies of the GI tract, and infectious diseases.

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Contact Information: Email: Dr. Linda Jelicks

External Links:


Wade Koba

Mr. Koba supports multimodality applications in the MRRC. In addition to performing imaging of rodent models, Mr. Koba supports imaging of aquatic vertebrates.

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Contact Information: Email: Mr. Wade Koba

External Links:

Publications

  1. Whole-brain circuit dissection in free-moving animals reveals cell-specific mesocorticolimbic networks.Michaelides M, Anderson SA, Ananth M, Smirnov D, Thanos PK, Neumaier JF, Wang GJ, Volkow ND, Hurd YL. J Clin Invest. 2013 Dec 2;123(12):5342-50. doi: 10.1172/JCI72117. Epub 2013 Nov 15. PMID: 24231358
  2. Combined treatment of the experimental human papilloma virus-16-positive cervical and head and neck cancers with cisplatin and radioimmunotherapy targeting viral E6 oncoprotein. Harris M, Wang XG, Jiang Z, Phaeton R, Koba W, Goldberg GL, Casadevall A, Dadachova E. Br J Cancer. 2013 Feb 5. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.43.
  3. Mesenchymal Bone Marrow Cell Therapy in a Mouse Model of Chagas Disease. Where Do the Cells Go? Jasmin , Jelicks LA, Koba W, Tanowitz HB, Mendez-Otero R, de Carvalho ACC, Spray DC. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2012 6(12): e1971. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0001971
  4. MicroPET/SPECT/CT Imaging of Small Animal Models of Disease. Koba W, Jelicks LA, Fine EJ. Am J Pathol. 2012 Dec 5. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23219729
  5. Pasireotide (SOM230) is effective for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) in a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) conditional knockout mouse model. Quinn TJ, Yuan Z, Adem A, Geha R, Vrikshajanani C, Koba W, Fine E, Hughes DT, Schmid HA, Libutti SK. Surgery. 2012 Dec;152(6):1068-77. PMID: 23102680
  6. Imaging of Small-Animal Models of Infectious Diseases. Jelicks LA, Lisanti MP, Machado FS, Weiss LM, Tanowitz HB, Desruisseaux MS. Am J Pathol. 2012 Nov 27. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23201133
  7. The KCNQ1-KCNE2 K⁺ channel is required for adequate thyroid I⁻ uptake. Purtell K, Paroder-Belenitsky M, Reyna-Neyra A, Nicola JP, Koba W, Fine E, Carrasco N, Abbott GW. FASEB J. 2012 Aug;26(8):3252-9. PMID: 22549510
  8. Imaging devices for use in small animals. Koba W, Kim K, Lipton ML, Jelicks L, Das B, Herbst L, Fine E. Semin Nucl Med. 2011 May;41(3):151-65. Review.PMID:21440693
  9. Advances in imaging of animal models of Chagas disease. Jelicks LA, Tanowitz HB. Adv Parasitol. 2011;75:193-208.
  10. Aspirin treatment of mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and implications for the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Mukherjee S, Machado FS, Huang H, Oz HS, Jelicks LA, Prado CM, Koba W, Fine EJ, Zhao D, Factor SM, Collado JE, Weiss LM, Tanowitz HB, Ashton AW.PLoS One. 2011 Feb 15;6(2):e16959. PMID:21347238
  11. Therapeutically targeting cyclin D1 in primary tumors arising from loss of Ini1. Smith ME, Cimica V, Chinni S, Jana S, Koba W, Yang Z, Fine E, Zagzag D, Montagna C, Kalpana GV. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Jan 4;108(1):319-24. Epub 2010 Dec 20.PMID:21173237
  12. Micro-positron emission tomography in the evaluation of Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease: Comparison with other modalities. Prado CM, Fine EJ, Koba W, Zhao D, Rossi MA, Tanowitz HB, Jelicks LA. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2009 Nov;81(5):900-5. PMID:19861629
  13. Kcne2 deletion uncovers its crucial role in thyroid hormone biosynthesis. Roepke TK, King EC, Reyna-Neyra A, Paroder M, Purtell K, Koba W, Fine E, Lerner DJ, Carrasco N, Abbott GW. Nat Med. 2009 Oct;15(10):1186-94. Epub 2009 Sep 20.PMID:19767733
  14. Chronic effects of dietary carbohydrate variation on [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose uptake in rodent heart. Fine EJ, Miao W, Koba W, Volek JS, Blaufox MD. Nucl Med Commun. 2009 Sep;30(9):675-80.PMID:19525881
  15. Proangiogenic contribution of adiponectin toward mammary tumor growth in vivo. Landskroner-Eiger S, Qian B, Muise ES, Nawrocki AR, Berger JP, Fine EJ, Koba W, Deng Y, Pollard JW, Scherer PE. Clin Cancer Res. 2009 May 15;15(10):3265-76. Epub 2009 May 15.PMID:19447867
  16. Radioimmunotherapy of experimental human metastatic melanoma with melanin-binding antibodies and in combination with dacarbazine. Revskaya E, Jongco AM, Sellers RS, Howell RC, Koba W, Guimaraes AJ, Nosanchuk JD, Casadevall A, Dadachova E. Clin Cancer Res. 2009 Apr 1;15(7):2373-9. Epub 2009 Mar 17. PMID: 19293257


PET/CT/SPECT data export and transmission

Data can be exported directly from the InVeon system in DICOM format, and either transferred directly to the user's home folder on the cluster (highly preferred — it doesn't take long), or copied to a USB drive for Dr. Smith to upload (whhhyyyyyy??). In the latter case, you'll need about 2-5 GB of free space on the drive. It can then be converted to NIFTI format with rotonii and subjected to other analysis, including PMOD-based registration.

External Links

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